South African Cultural Observatory

An Early Assessment of The Impact of The Covid-19 Crisis on The Cultural and Creative Industries in South Africa

BY 29.06.20

As of March 2020, the South African Cultural Observatory (SACO) conducted a survey targeting businesses and freelancers in the cultural and creative industries (CCIs). This survey was undertaken so that the Observatory could ascertain the impact of the measures that were put in place to manage the COVID-19 pandemic in the country. The survey also sought to understand the adaptation strategies that the sector was using to cope with the pandemic, and what kind of support the industry would find useful. Run over a period of two months, the survey yielded interesting insights for the industry (Covid19 impact on CCIs).

An overwhelming number of the participants (82%) had a turnover of about R525 000, 00 per annum. Very few, (12%) of those surveyed indicated that they could continue with 50% or more of their normal business activities, i.e. face-to-face operations. This was largely because more than two-thirds (69%) of the participants were involved face-to-face activities which were not permitted. The businesses using mostly the face-to-face mode were also less likely to be able to conduct their business online, work from home, do other work, or use the time to build up stock. They were also less likely to make use of their reserve funds and more likely to depend on the financial support of family, it was learned.

A very small percentage (15%) of the employers and freelancers who completed the survey believed that they would see an increase in demand for their products and/or services because they were able to conduct their business online.

A sizable number (40%) of the respondents were now using their reserves to survive, while 21% said they were relying on family and friends for support.

At least a third (35%) said that they would make use of the shutdown time to move their businesses to online platforms, whilst about (32%) said they would use this time to upskill themselves.  The understanding of those wanting to move to online platforms is that the online environment would expose them to an even larger, newer and geographically diverse audience.  

The majority (79%) of the employers and freelancers claimed to know about the government support that was being offered at the time, however, only a quarter (25%) of them believed that they qualified for it largely due to the fact that their businesses have remained informal.

In economic terms, the study shows a direct impact on total output of the Covid-19 shutdown on the sector to be just over R53 billion. The sector shutdown is expected to reduce South Africa’s GDP (direct and indirect impact) by R99,7 billion in 2020. 

COVID-19 Impacts on the Sports Sector COVID-19 Impacts on the Sports Sector

World over, sport is recognised by many societies and governments as a major contributor to economic and social development. The COVID-19 pandemic has affected sports of all types across the world and is likely to have a major negative impact.

READ MORE
Youth is not wasted on Young Creatives: The Creative Economy is where South Africa’s Youth will be national carriers in a Post-Covid-19 world Youth is not wasted on Young Creatives: The Creative Economy is where South Africa’s Youth will be national carriers in a Post-Covid-19 world

Young Creatives in South Africa have heaps of challenges stacked up against them. Their reality is like that of many youth and people whose livelihoods depend on informal labour practises and gig work. Nothing makes this more evident than the effects of Covid-19 on life as we know it. However it is through their infinite potential, innovative capabilities and resilience that the country is endowed with the means to solve the complex problems in the ever-uncertain present and towards a Fourth Industrial future.

READ MORE

SA Cultural Observatory releases report on the impact of Covid-19 on Cultural and Creative Industries SA Cultural Observatory releases report on the impact of Covid-19 on Cultural and Creative Industries

In late March, soon after President Ramaphosa announced several measures to limit the spread of coronavirus in the country, the South African Cultural Observatory undertook a study to evaluate the impact of Covid-19 and associated measures on the cultural and creative industries (CCIs). This took the form of both the online survey and economic impact assessment to find out what impact these measures were having on businesses and freelancers in the sector, the adaptation strategies, and the most useful kinds of support that could be provided. The study, the most comprehensive for the sector, was undertaken between March 30 and May 4, 2020 and provides an early assessment of the impact of the shutdown on the sector.

READ MORE
Don’t let Covid-19 kill SA’s cultural sector and its economic value Don’t let Covid-19 kill SA’s cultural sector and its economic value

Cultural and creative industries are being recognised for their contribution to GDP, job creation and innovation

READ MORE

More News
Executive Direction June 2020 Executive Direction June 2020

As we all know and have somewhat even become accustomed to it, due to social distancing measures put in place to fight the Covid-19 pandemic, since March 26, we have all not able to travel to any venue to consume any form of arts and culture products. Libraries, archives, museums, films and television productions, theatre and orchestra performances, fashion shows, concert tours, zoos as well as music and arts festivals have all been closed or come to a complete halt. Could this signal a death knell for the sector? The answer has to be a Big No, at least not if we can help it as consumers and key stakeholders of the cultural and creative industries.

COVID-19 Impacts on the Sports Sector COVID-19 Impacts on the Sports Sector

World over, sport is recognised by many societies and governments as a major contributor to economic and social development. The COVID-19 pandemic has affected sports of all types across the world and is likely to have a major negative impact.

Mapping the Economic Value of the Creative Industry Mapping the Economic Value of the Creative Industry

In many countries, the growing importance of the cultural and creative industries is increasingly being recognised. The SA Cultural Observatory recently released its second Economic Mapping of the Cultural and Creative Industries in South Africa 2020 (Economic Mapping Study).

Youth is not wasted on Young Creatives: The Creative Economy is where South Africa’s Youth will be national carriers in a Post-Covid-19 world Youth is not wasted on Young Creatives: The Creative Economy is where South Africa’s Youth will be national carriers in a Post-Covid-19 world

Young Creatives in South Africa have heaps of challenges stacked up against them. Their reality is like that of many youth and people whose livelihoods depend on informal labour practises and gig work. Nothing makes this more evident than the effects of Covid-19 on life as we know it. However it is through their infinite potential, innovative capabilities and resilience that the country is endowed with the means to solve the complex problems in the ever-uncertain present and towards a Fourth Industrial future.

Call to Curators – SA Cultural Observatory Researches Debates About The Repatriation Of Museum Artifacts Call to Curators – SA Cultural Observatory Researches Debates About The Repatriation Of Museum Artifacts

The debates about the restitution of museum artifacts taken from African countries, mostly during the colonial era, has a long history. However, it was brought to high prominence again recently by the French president, Emmanuel Macron, who said, in an address to 800 students in Burkina Faso on 28th of November 2017: “I cannot accept that a large part of cultural heritage from several African countries is in France. There are historical explanations for that, but there are no valid justifications that are durable and unconditional”.

Connect with us