South African Cultural Observatory

Executive Direction - August 2019

BY Unathi Lutshaba 30.08.19

This year the International Women’s Day theme was #BalanceforBetter. It essentially talks to a balanced world being a better world. The International Women’s Day partners adopted a year-long campaign that seeks to encourage as many people to contribute in ‘forging a more gender-balanced’ world while celebrating women’s achievements.

In this newsletter, to commemorate the Women’s month, we took a view to dedicate the entire edition to women who are involved in the arts, culture and creative industries. Our purpose is to encourage them to continue to excel in their chosen artistic areas, while they inspire other women- young and old.

While many female artists may still face challenges in the industry, there are many who continue to push the boundaries to remove the obstacles, not only for themselves, but also for those will follow on their footsteps. Women often face gatekeeping systems that can either open or close off opportunities for them to advance in their artistic careers. The more women who enter the industry, the higher are the chances for dismantling gatekeeping systems

In celebrating the women in the sector, we give them extra courage and acknowledgement that someone notices and appreciates their work. Speaking at UNESCO-sanctioned International Women’s Day event, musicians Victor Solf and Simon Carpentier from the group Her echo this sentiment and contend that “it is important to recognize the talents and achievements of women as creators and cultural entrepreneurs”.

Until then,

Unathi Lutshaba

Executive Director: South African Cultural Observatory

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